Dangerous Animals In Asia

69 posts in this topic

Posted

I’ve spent a lot of time in Indochina over the years but I can honestly say that I have only ever seen one snake (I killed it) and one Scorpion (already dead, killed by grandmother of girlfriend) so where are they all?

I was taking a shower last night and a fkn huge spider caught my eye, the biggest one I’ve ever seen in the region and it prompted me to make this post as I wasn’t sure if it was dangerous or not (not anymore as it felt the might of my flip flop).

Oh, and the giant centipede with it's venomous nip that found it’s way on my girlfriends waist one day... Oh and the frog that my GF tell me not to touch because if I did, I'd get extremely sick after a few days.

Can someone tell me exactly what creatures one should be aware of in Indochina, with respect to life threatening or painful bites/stings, with a description of the creature.

Thanks :thmbdn:

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Posted

In Thailand the spiders are ok, not venomous.

Obviously you have to be careful around snakes, but usually they will try to escape if they can.

There are a few types of centipede that can give you a very nasty bite(venomous).

Scorpion's as far as I know are'nt deadly here unless there are more than on type, the normal small black ones will give you a nasty sting.Be carful when picking up blocks or stones as they like to live under them.

They have some tree frogs that are very poisinous usually brightly coulored.

The really big bee type things can give a nast sting as well but they are'nt very aggesive.

Before I came to Thailand I'd never even been stung by a normal bee, since I've been here, lots bee stings(usually by stepping on dead ones) and scorpion twice once on the hand and once when one was in my shorts (came close to a place you REALLY dont want to get stung :thmbdn: )

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Posted

So how were the scorpion stings? :thmbdn:

The Thais have a lot of respect for centipedes, I don't think you can die from a bite, but it's said to be very painful. I had an infestation some time ago, there are small fingersized 'babies', orange body and green legs, and brown/black adults who are strong and hard to kill.

Some jellyfish are poisonous, Hua-Hin is notorious for a dangerous variety.

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Posted

The scorpion stings were BAD the one on my hand I turned grey and nearly passed out. The one on the top of my inner thigh my whole leg went numb and felt icey cold with a lot of pain... you've never seen someone get a pair of shorts off as quick :thmbdn:

There are a few different types of centipedes the normal one (Gin Gu) can give you a nasty bite but there is one(Da Cab) much bigger and flatter (not really sure if its a centipedes) that is supposed to be really bad. There was one in the shop the other week, big about 6inches (15cm) Dty had her foot on it but it was still alive, her mum came screaming to the house for me to help, they took it as serious as a snake.

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Posted

I tried to kill one of those centipedes while in the South on an Island. I had to stamp on it 6 or 7 times before it gave up the fight... tough f****rs

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Posted

I need a favour. I'm writing a section about dangerous animals in the region for the static content and I need a decent picture of one of the big stinging centipedes. I wonder, if you see one and get the opportunity, could you snap a decent picture for me?

I also need a shot of a scorpion.

I won't ask you to approach any snakes :whistling:

I'd be really grateful :lol:

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Posted

I'd say that scorned women are the most dangerous creatures in the region :whistling:

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Posted

I need a favour. I'm writing a section about dangerous animals in the region for the static content and I need a decent picture of one of the big stinging centipedes. I wonder, if you see one and get the opportunity, could you snap a decent picture for me?

I also need a shot of a scorpion.

I won't ask you to approach any snakes :whistling:

I'd be really grateful :lol:

I have a nice photo of a blue viper in a tree in my garden. It's located on my blog - http://tropicalliving.blogspot.com, you're welcome to use it if you'd like.

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Posted

Nice pic, thanks... I'll crop it down and use it on this page... http://www.orientexpat.com/thailand/faq/snakes

... I'll also be sure to credit you underneath the image.

What can you tell me about that variety... I tried to dig up some info about it but I'm struggling. Is it found in Thailand, or only Indonesia?

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Posted

Here is a picture of a Centipede taken on Borneo, it was about 25cm long.

Snakes are not really a worry, as long as you don't put your hands where you can't see them. Centipedes scare me, I have been bitten twice (back and foot) and it was extremely painfull.

The frogs in SE Asia are not related to the Poison-arrow Frogs of South America and not as poisonous, if at all.

post-477-1187914181_thumb.jpg

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Posted

Excellent.

Centipedes give me the creeps.

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Posted

What can you tell me about that variety... I tried to dig up some info about it but I'm struggling. Is it found in Thailand, or only Indonesia?

Actually, I don't know much about it. I did a little research that pointed to it being extremely poisonous which my neighbours agreed with. It is definitely found in Indonesia as that's where I am - don't know about Thailand. My neighbours say that it is rare as few of them had ever seen one before. It was very calm and put up with me poking about taking photos for a few days and then just disappeared.

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Posted

Can someone tell me exactly what creatures one should be aware of in Indochina, with respect to life threatening or painful bites/stings, with a description of the creature.

I think, mosquitos are the main danger in SE Asia.

A certain group of mosquitos (anopheles) are transmitting malaria in all SE Asia.

Other groups (aedes) are transmitting yellow fever (not in Asia) and dengue fever (a serious danger in wide parts of SE Asia).

For a weak person such infection might cause death. Infection is not only outside in rural area, but also within the cities possible.

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Posted

My wife.

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Posted

Of course, you are right Yohan. But somehow, a mosquito on my leg does not have quite the same effect on me as does a Centipede :whistling:

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Posted

I need a favour. I'm writing a section about dangerous animals in the region for the static content and I need a decent picture of one of the big stinging centipedes. I wonder, if you see one and get the opportunity, could you snap a decent picture for me?

I also need a shot of a scorpion.

I won't ask you to approach any snakes :whistling:

I'd be really grateful :lol:

In my backyard a few days ago.About 12-13 cm,have seen about 20 cm

post-108-1188271755_thumb.jpg

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Posted

Cheers!... I'll add all these pics in the next few days.

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Posted

Yeb, You need to watch out for those mosquitoes, dengue fever is highly dangerous and easily transmittable.

The death rate is pretty high unless you catch on and treat it quickly.

I am surprised that nobody talked about ants, since some of them have really nasty bites. I know spiders are suppose to be able to keep down the local bug population, but I'll be lying if I said their bite don't suck.

And there are the bed bugs, and other nasty critters.

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Posted

And there are the bed bugs,
The most dangerous creature in my bed is just under 50 Kgs. :whistling:

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Posted

The beasty burning a hole in the back of my head wondering why I'm referring to her as such is a 40kg creature!

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Posted

Here in the LOS, there is a prolific number venemous and non venemous snakes of all sizes.

The Issan area seems to be the favoured home for many of them.

My friend Joe from near Surin, called me over the weekend and informed me that he had just killed a snake. He didnt know what type it was. This brings his tally to 45, over a 10 yr period.

I have stayed at Joe's house several times for long periods. But only once have I seen him performing as a snake killer.

Some time ago, we were in his study watching a dvd, when all 4 dogs started barking and when looking out the window, we saw they were all congregating in one spot. 'Its a snake,' said Joe.

Even Joe was surprised as we approached and suddenly a large cobra reared up.

################ said Joe. 'need some new gear.'

We drove to Surin and from the market area he bought 2 long bamboo rods and 2 fishing spikes about 8" long, which had several protusions sticking out.

Back home he fitted the spikes to the bamboos and we headed out. His wife Jang and a couple of relatives had long gone. The dogs were now in a different location.

I asked if he wanted a hand but he declined. He worked better alone and no one to distract him

Bearing in mind Joe was carrying a fair size ale gut, I was surprised how nimble he was as he circled around the cobra. The dogs seemed to know what was going to happen and backed off. It was all over in seconds as Joe speared the 'tail end' to the ground. The cobra reared up like lightning facing him and received the 2nd spear just under the head. Joe immediatly stuck the head to the ground.

To my surprise, a local suddenly appeared with a large knife and severed the head.

That was Joes 5th cobra in a total of 8....... :D

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Posted

I've always found shotguns to be fairly effective snake removal tools.

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Posted

That was Joes 5th cobra in a total of 8....... :D

Lucky guy, enjoy your meal and give a nice gift to your lady...

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Posted

Can someone ID this snake in the picture... I killed it in '04 with my slingshot... also in Surin Province...

post-1-1188913781_thumb.jpg

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Posted

Will now send pic to friend Joe at Surin to see if can ID............. :D

He now logs all his exterminations.

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Posted

Lucky guy, enjoy your meal and give a nice gift to your lady...

Hi Yohan.

Looks like you dropped me in it, bigtime!!................. :D

Showed your very interesting pics to my wife.

For the snake bowl, she say; "UGH!"

For the handbag, she say; " Darling, I want a handbag like this please!"

Me; "OK honey, no problem."................OOOPS!.... :( ..... :(

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Posted

Can someone ID this snake in the picture... I killed it in '04 with my slingshot... also in Surin Province...

post-1-1188913781_thumb.jpg

Inquiries ongoing.

But my mate thinks it is a very young 'Russells' viper.

Not usually about in the daytime. Must have been disturbed.

It would not have been able to hear you or see you clearly. Vision very good at night.

If ID is correct, it would have been poisonous.

Did you see 2 fangs with grooved teeth at front of upper jaw?

............. :D ...... :(

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Posted

It was disturbed because we were draining the water from a pond, just behind me in the picture and there were people everywhere.

I can't remember much about it's face or fangs, I didn't examine that closely... even though it was clearly dead and you can see blood running from it, I was still weary it might have one last lunge at me, so I kept it's head away from me.

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Posted

'Cancer patient dies in Thai hospital after being bitten by a snake that was hiding in a hospital gurney'...

http://www.citynews.ca/news/news_14507.aspx

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Posted

'Cancer patient dies in Thai hospital after being bitten by a snake that was hiding in a hospital gurney'...

Fate just did not deal kindly with that guy :D

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