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Origin of Japanese People

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Posted (edited)

Seems there is much "hatred" and disputes between the Japanese and Koreans and Chinese. There is much controversy where Japanese come from. Their language itself has a lot of similar Chinese characters in it. Yet, the dislike between Chinese and Japanese :P

Where do you think Japanese originate from?

Here are some interesting articles :P

Extracted from http://users.tmok.com/~tumble/jpp/japor.html

In Chinese classical literature, at least two texts mention the prehistory of Japan.

Wei Zhi - Dong Yi Chuan (Official history of Wei, about Eastern Strangers, /Gishi-touiden/ -- jp, or known as /Gishi-wajinden/) reports about Japanese in AD 3c. Beside a description of the female governor and the tattooed faces of men, there is a part that says, "When asked, everyone answered they were descendants of TaiBo of Wu (/taihaku/ of /Go/ -- jp )".

Sima Qian (/Shibasen/ -- jp) wrote that Xu Fu (/Johuku/ -- jp) said to Shi Huang Di of Qin (/Shikoutei/ of /Shin/), that he was leaving for the Eastern Sea to search for a medicine for eternal life in Fenglai (/Hourai/ -- jp) islands, which the Chinese people consider to be Japan. He left with about 3000 people, but didn't come back because he became the king there.

From these texts, still many people seem to believe Japanese is just a branch of Chinese. It's too arrogant to ignore these texts, but too naive to believe the legend blindly...

The origins of Japanese Peoplehttp://www.jref.com/culture/origins_japanese_people.shtml

The above link says the Japanese do not really know.......... :rolleyes:

The Origins of the Japanese People

Although closely akin to their Asian neighbors in both physical appearance and cultural background, many Japanese today maintain a strong belief in the unique identity of the Japanese race. Perhaps the strongest argument in support of this notion is the fact that the Japanese language (excluding imported words - mainly from China) has no close affinity to any other spoken language anywhere. It is also argued that the way the Japanese have shaped and molded their landscape, although strongly influenced by external cultures, is unique to the Japanese isles.

Recent archaeological evidence suggests man (homo erectus) was present on what today constitutes the Japanese archipelago during the early Paleolithic period, some 370 thousand years ago. Links have been established between the earliest known Japanese artifacts and those discovered in China dating from a similar period. Finds dating from the mid and late Paleolithic periods are well represented throughout Japan, and indeed for all later periods. Correlation between artifacts found in Japan and at various sites on the Asian continent leave little doubt that these nomadic groups of hunter-gatherers migrated to Japan from areas in both north and south Asia, often across land bridges which existed during cold 'Ice-age' periods.

The above extracted from http://hkuhist2.hku.hk/nakasendo/origins.htm

Related links

http://www.absoluteastronomy.com/encyclope...nese_people.htm

Who are the Japanese?

Scientific studies in different fields - dialectology, archaeology, anthropology, genetics, geology, and histology - indicate that proto-Koreans began to colonize the Japanese islands some 2,500 years ago. The immigrants from Korea pushed aside the stone-age Jomon inhabitants. The invaders numbered more than one million over a period of about 1,000 years and overwhelmed the minority natives who numbered much less.

Extracted from http://www.kimsoft.com/2004/jp-origin.htm

So, I really do not understand the hatred..................between these countries, Japan, China and Korea :whistling:

Any views or opinions? :P

Edited by Jingle

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Posted

A-ha...now I think I understand origins of Taiwanese people and can guess where the hatred between them and mainland China come from...

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Posted (edited)

well, people tend to get defensiveand touchy when it comes to the truth or the possible truth being revealed..... :whistling::rolleyes:

Edited by Jingle

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Posted

The antipathy isn't just in that part of the world. The Dutch, Scandinavians and English are all descended from old Germanic tribes as, obviously, are the Germans of today. Try an Englishman in the pub that his ancestors were German and listen to the torrent of blissful ignorance.

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Posted

lets just say 1000year from now, people ask where does tawain came from? there you go

all asia country start from china many moon ago, spread out on their own and become the country today.

hatred is a personal view of thing or one indivitual, not a country

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Posted (edited)

Chingy......hatred is a personal view of thing or one indivitual, not a country
Yes, VERY true and who/what do you think runs these countries??? :P HUMANS!!!!! :whistling:

Hence, the personal views come in and affect their emotions and thinking :rolleyes: Thus the Chinese hate the Japanese and vice versa and the Koreans hate Japanese/Chinese and vice versa.

Countries are run by humans, are they not? :P

all asia country start from china

:P So the Japanese and Koreans saying they hate the Chinese is like saying they hate themselves..........same for the Chinese, Taiwanese, Hong Konger, Vietnamese etc! :P

Edited by Jingle

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Posted (edited)

The antipathy isn't just in that part of the world. The Dutch, Scandinavians and English are all descended from old Germanic tribes as, obviously, are the Germans of today. Try an Englishman in the pub that his ancestors were German and listen to the torrent of blissful ignorance.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

There are clear information about German, Roman, Slavic and other groups in Europe, however the situation about Japan is different.

Question: From where are the Japanese, their language and their customs?

Answer: We do not know.

There are plenty of studies comparing customs, language and people about the origin of the Japanese people. Investigations covered areas as far as Finland in Europe and Myanmar in SoutEast Asia, and all Pacific area around like Hawaii or Philippines.

Whatever argument is coming up, there is always an argument against it.

Beside other (small) groups, like Ainu in North or Ryukyu in South, we all, who are living in Japan, agree, there are clearly 2 different 'types' of Japanese people, despite they are all the same ethnic group.

Many scientists are considering that 'people' were entering the Japanese region at least in 2 groups and settled down in NorthEast (Kanto) like Tokyo and in SouthWest (Kansai) like Osaka.

Indeed, Japanese feel the difference between Kanto-Kansai. Although they are all Japanese, they are reacting differently and are speaking with different accent.

I think, Japanese are people, mixed out of various immigrants of different groups, which entered the present area from the North and from the South.....almost impossible to trace back...

True or not, who knows?

Edited by yohan

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Posted

country is just a name to divide the people or indivitual, for example this is my house and that is your house, conflict cause by people emotion, sample your dog shiet on my lawn, there for i hate you, don't cross over to my lawn or else i'll kill you, that is an example of hatred

china have a history of many kingdom, many king, and each is different, not many kingdom get along with each other, there were many war between king, at the end lets the strongest king rule all. (under one heaven) there for china doesn't consist of one people, or one culture.

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Posted

Visit the Ainus up in Hokkaido and you will learn that they are the 'real Japanese'.

Now where did the Ainus come from?

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Posted (edited)

Visit the Ainus up in Hokkaido and you will learn that they are the 'real Japanese'.

Now where did the Ainus come from?

The Ainus have been in Hokkaido since the end of the last ice age (about 10,000 years ago), which means far before the Japanese came to well, Japan.

These days, 'real' Ainu are very few,

As far as their origin is concerned, unfortunately, we have no history book dating 10,000 years and hence, to this day, it remains quite obscure.

Edited by Bluecat

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We do not even know, if the Ainu are Caucasians or Asian race...

Earlier research was pointing to Caucasians, but new DNA research shows some evidence, that this might not be true..

The origin of Japanese people - including groups like the Ainu or the Ryukyu population - is unclear.

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