Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Modem setup for Unitel 3g Internet in Laos

3 posts in this topic

Posted

I'm going to get this Unitel 3G service on the recommendation of someone in this website, but can you tell me how to set it up properly when I get it. I'm no good at technical stuff. I just want to plug it in a use the Internet and Skype.

Also I'd like to know how good the reception and coverage is in and around Vientiane. How far out of the city can you go and still get high speeds?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

Hi VientianeV

I got mine and it came with set up instructions in English, Very much a 'plug and play' thing.

Good coverage around VT but I don't know about the outskirts.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted

If you haven't already got it, you shouldn't have any problem installing the Unitel 3G modem yourself. Assuming it was charged when you bought it, plug it into a USB port and the program installs automatically; it loads each time you plug the modem in. Click to connect and you'll get a visual and audible confirmation of internet connection.

The interface is simple to check status; diagnostics shows signal strength which appears very low but more than 10/99 will give access. 13-19 is usual for me and 23 is the highest I've seen around VTE up to 10km or so; also available in provincial towns with varying distance of coverage, depending on population I guess.

If you take a laptop to a Unitel office they can install it for you and explain how the subscription works. One or two of them speak reasonable English at HO on Nongbone Rd. e.g. the LT100 sub costs 100,000 kip for 3GB and needs to be recharged on the 1st day of each month. Remaining data balance including bonus accumulates and carries forward. The service uses standard Unitel phone refill cards of any value, available everywhere.

More info on Laos internet and phones at http://go2c.me/laocomms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0

Orient Expat Friends
Meet your global neighbours. . .



  • Posts

    • AIS Switching from Pre-paid to Post-paid
      By Morlar · Posted
      I switched from AIS to DTAC in 2008, quite a few years ago now and I've been on the same post-paid contract (and still have the same number) ever since. At the time all I needed was my passport and address if I remember correctly. Initially they give you a very small monthly credit limit, but I now have a 10,000 Baht limit and I think they'd give me more if I asked for it. As an aside, number porting has been available in Thailand for a few years now i.e. you don't have to give up your number when you switch providers.
    • Cost of living rising fast in Thailand
      By kamikaze · Posted
      I noticed a short latte in Costa is 95 baht. Sounds expensive to me. The last time I had a short latte at Starbucks - a few years ago - it was 75 baht.
    • AIS Switching from Pre-paid to Post-paid
      By kamikaze · Posted
      I believe it is pretty simple with DTAC too. I recently registered my DTAC prepaid SIM. They just took a photo of my passport details, did something on my phone and on a laptop, and it was finished. I got an SMS saying I was registered. Deadline for registration is end of July.
    • AIS Switching from Pre-paid to Post-paid
      By Stocky · Posted
      I've been a 1-2-Go pay as you go phone user in Thailand for over ten years. However, changes to my contract mean I no longer have an Indonesian SIM from the company, so it's cheaper for International roaming to get a post-paid phone contract rather than continue pre-paid. I wasn't too sure how difficult they were going to make this having heard of requests for work permits and/or 'yellow books' so I called into the AIS service centre at Hat Yai Central Festival today with some trepidation. Indeed after I explained what I wanted the young lady asked to see my passport and work permit, but after explaining I was here on a non-O marriage visa and worked in Indonesia she was happy enough to settle with my passport, my bank book and my wife's ID card. Forms were filled in photocopies signed, a few taps on the keyboard and hey-presto I was switched from pre-paid to post-paid. All remarkably painless.
    • Cambodia how's it compare with rest of South East Asia
      By Stocky · Posted
      ...and that's gauged how, do you have a witometer or perchance a handy wit chart.