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Chinglish - Funny translation gaffes

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Posted

Funny translations gaffes AKA Chinglish...

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Posted

That one sort of captions itself..

Was it near the cucumbers?

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Posted

Nah it's the meat section

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Posted

oh Lordy.... ;)

;)

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Posted

Gan Tsai? Pickled/dried vegetables? Some morons in China probably just looked up the word in dictionary and made a sign. The problem with simplified Chinese. And the moron probably didn't look up the difference in tone. ;)

Gan - to do, dry, and often used in conjunction with other words (like your mother) in southern China to swear.

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Posted

And this one, a directory board in a Chinese hospital, is DEFINITELY NSFW!:

Most of the women I've spoken to reckon the "C" bomb is the single worst word in the English language.

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Posted

Quality again

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Posted

You have to give that to the Chinese, they call a cat, a cat... ;)

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Posted

The story I heard was that the hospital paid some gweilo to translate for them. Whether they pinged him off or he just wanted to be a dick, he offered that as a translation and they- not knowing any different- accepted it.

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Posted

It doesn't sound likely, because no matter how much of a dick he is, he wouldn't use Fetal Heart Custody as translation. It's a literal translation, and it's done in a style only someone unfamiliar with English would do so. I am used to seeing these type of translation in China all the time, but after a while, I just block it out for some reason. There are actual medical terms to describe these things, so I guess none of the doctors actually paid any attention to this. A cardiotocography room might be a bit too technical for some though. I think the other one is supposed to be a colposcopy room.

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Posted

Gan - to do, dry, and often used in conjunction with other words (like your mother) in southern China to swear.

That answers something I was pondering. . because I saw a video with people fighting in Hainan and they kept saying "ni gan ma!" I thought it was short for "ni gan shenme? (what are you doing). . .I stand corrected..

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Posted

In Hokkien "gan" is usually written as "kan" in Singapore and is the "F bomb". Ties in rather nastily in the expression that is so coarse it's abbreviated to KNNBCCB, which involves the f-bomb, the c-bomb and your mum!

There are no real coarse swear words in Malay or Indonesian, so the ethnic locals there swear in Hokkien or one of the other Chinese dialects.

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Posted (edited)

Hakka isn't the same as say Fujianese.

And Fanta, ni gan ma, does mean what are you doing? Gan ni ma is the one you are thinking of, and please don't start saying these to southern Chinese. ;)

Of course, Chinese tones makes everything complicated for someone unfamiliar to the language. Simplified Chinese farther complicates matters. Because if that Gan character used in the sign is used mean dried/pickled vegetables, then there are actually 2 characters with very different meaning in different tones, unless, of course, this is used in the colloquial/provincial dialect sense, then..., that could mean something else entirely.

Ok, I just checked, they usually use 1 simplified Chinese gan characters for both traditional characters.

There are 2 basic Gans in traditional Chinese. I might've mixed both of their meaning due to simplified nature, so it might be confusing. 1 Gan, dry, to dry, dried and so on. Another Gan, with exact same simplified character (freaking hate that), means to do, to herd, to rush, to roll, and so on.

Edited by Starseeker

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Posted

More NSFW Chinglish:

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Posted

Simplified Chinese again, too lazy to keep trying. ;)

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Posted

post-130-091328500 1286702882_thumb.jpg

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;) ;)

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:D

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Posted

The last one should be a hoax, since katamari is a pretty famous game, and namco isn't a small publisher.

The first ATM one doesn't even make sense in Chinese..., unless he screwed that up too? ;)

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Posted

Do you work for the CCP starseeker?

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Posted

ROFL............., that's the funniest thing I've ever heard. ;):D

Do you read threads selectively or something?

If I did, would I be criticizing CCP and enjoying the mayhem that they are having over the Nobel Peace Prize winner? Hell, if I really did, maybe I'll make crap load more money now, and getting ready to retire right about now with all the government money! :D

Wait, what does that have to do with this? ;)

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Posted

dumplings-human.jpg

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Posted (edited)

Made from general bits of human, or specific bits- man dumplings?

Reminds me of the old joke that ends with "Señor, this time the bull win".

Edited by Uncle Gweilo

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Posted

You are confusing it with gan (3) 敢 which means to dare

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Posted

Now you are getting the hang of that contrasen(y)a UG, are you studying Spanish by the way coz if you are , you need to speak to Priscilla

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Posted

No I am not.

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Posted

More translation laziness:

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Hotdogs made of flour, cream and sugar?

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Posted

I know Northampton isn't in China but...

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Posted

I used to work for a major pizza delivery company in Sydney many years ago. In one unit one of our customers just happened to be one of the gay bath houses near Kings Cross. I tried to get our order centre to mark the customer delivery instructions with "entry up the back passage", but they were wise to me. :unsure:

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Posted

I found these earlier....

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post-4949-0-58633800-1310121176_thumb.jp

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Posted

The second one is awesome, seeing as ESL in China is such a mulitmillion dollars industry, but they still can't get a fact checker? :bleh:

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Posted

Translate server error... Fukkin' brilliant! :bleh:

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