Renting a PO Box in Thailand

13 posts in this topic

Posted

This question comes up from time to time and I set up my own today at the Chiang Rai main post office. I could have had one in my local post office but I decided to get one in the city instead. It was straightforward enough and the CR postmaster is one of the friendliest guys I've ever met in Thailand. You're supposed to show your passport but in my case, my Thai driver's license was sufficient. It's ฿500 per year and I was able to pay two years in advance. Some paperwork, and 30 minutes later, I'm the proud owner of a low two digit PO Box.

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Posted

Slightly off topic but I knew someone who had one in Cambodia once.

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Posted

It's ฿500 per year and I was able to pay two years in advance...

I am surprised to hear that you have to pay for that. Actually you are helping them - your mail will not be delivered but you go to the post-office to pick it up.

Such services - P.O. Box - are free in Japan, also for companies, not only for individuals.

A P.O. Box is quite nice if you expect mail from abroad, the sender needs only the postal-code and the box no. and P.O. Box mail is rarely lost, as such mail will not be taken out of the post-office for delivery.

In this sense in your case, a P.O. Box is much better in Chiang Rai main post office than in a small post-office outside of the city.

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Posted

I am surprised to hear that you have to pay for that.

I've just briefly checked the postal services of a few countries and it appears that most charge for PO Boxes. For example, the Royal Mail in the UK charges and laughable £95.00 per year for a 'basic service' (around ฿5000)... so the Thailand Post PO box fee looks very reasonable to me. I guess you are paying for the actual material cost of the box, the locking mechanism, the maintenance, and site security. Sounds reasonable to me.

Incidentally, the cost in my local Amphur is only ฿300... but I don't want to list my Amphur when giving my PO Box address.

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Posted (edited)

I cannot compare, all what I can see however, if a P.O. Box would be not for free in Japan, nobody would use it, just waiting until the post-office is delivering the daily mail to your address, this is done 2 times a day, Monday to Saturday. P.O. Box is 24 h open in the main post offices.

However nowadays most parcels within Japan are not sent anymore by postal services, but by private delivery services, which include not only delivery to the home, but also to pick up your parcels from your own home, even sometimes packing and selling of cartons, tapes etc. - Some pick-up cars are also with freezer for food delivery from rural areas etc. Others are delivering suitcases, and golf-bags, and after use they will pick up them again and deliver them back to your home.

Edited by yohan

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Posted

if a P.O. Box would be not for free in Japan, nobody would use it

Nonsense. If a fee were charged, those individuals and business that require a PO box would pay for it. They'd have no alternative.

Indeed, the Japanese are very fortunate they get the service for free.

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Posted (edited)

.....If a fee were charged, those individuals and business that require a PO box would pay for it.

For what do you need a P.O.Box in Japan?

For sure if you have only domestic mail, and this is the big majority of all people living here, you do not need a post office at all. Most domestic mail-services are not done by the post office anymore in Japan, but by private delivery services.

Some services like short-time insurances are done in post-offices however. Some money transfer like taxes. Some delivery of standard letters/leaflets/invitation letters for fairs, some official mail like from courts or ministries.

Most payments like rent, phone etc. are done by banks or you can pay also in convenience stores.

Post office is now mainly used for overseas letters and overseas small parcels only, here in Tokyo many post-offices are already closed, even big ones, like post-office no. 108 near our place, closed including all P.O. Boxes.

Overseas letters are also declining because of E-Mail/internet.

I think, here in Japan postal services declined 80 percent or so during the last 15 years. - Most post offices here in Japan do not even offer any P.O. Box services anymore, the few doing it offering this service for free, of course.

They'd have no alternative.

Here in Japan there are many alternatives, especially for domestic services. Post office is for many ordinary Japanese a part of the past.

Edited by yohan

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Posted

500 baht a year is roughly comparable to the cost of a small bank deposit box in Bangkok.

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Posted

For what do you need a P.O.Box in Japan?

Why don't you ask all the individuals and business that use them? In my case, it is to protect my privacy from lunatics on the Internet.

To suggest ending that free service would eliminate that need, is ridiculous.

Frankly, you narcissism is tiresome.

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Posted

Hello all. An alternative to a PO Box, and better because some places will not accept a PO box in lieu of an address is to make a deal with a hotel to receive and hold your mail. When I lived in Pattaya, I did not want my adult daughter or family to Google Pattaya and read about where I was living, so I received my mail at another resort in Rayong. So long as I stayed there once a month (or close to it) they held my mail for free.

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Posted

We rented a PO Box in Hat Yai when we lived out of town because the postman often failed to find us/couldn't understand the address in English and the mail got returned to sender.

Now we're in Hat Yai with a sensible street address there's no need. I think the box rental was about Bht300 a year.

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Posted

and get a spare key cut that can save you alot of hassle

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Posted

A Post Office Box! .. That's pretty quaint! Are you going retro in your fading years Mandrunk? Just kidding! I know you probably have more use for one than me .. what with this site and all .. but I wouldn't receive enough stuff through the mail to warrant one. In 3 years here .. I've received two articles thought he post .. both birthday cards from my mother! :whistling:

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