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Live in Hong Kong and work in Shenzhen (round2)

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Posted

Hi everyone!

I got an offer work in SZ for 2 years, I had been researching about were to live and I found that is better for families lived in HK, and I found also in all the forums and googling that is very common for expats lived in HK and work in SZ (if I'm wrong please let me know), the question here is how do that? As I read in the Immigration department web page of HK you must work in HK in order to get the permission to live in HK, I'm wondering how other expats can live in HK and work in SZ without a problem, which kind of visa they have in HK?.

I really appreciate if someone can help me with this situation that is driving me crazy! :lol:

Best Regards.

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Posted

I've never heard of any foreigners living in Hong Kong and working Shenzhen. It's simply too problematic, unless you have both HKID and ChinaID (which foreigners cannot get). It would mean going through immigration twice a day getting 2 stamps China side in your passport each working day and if you don't have HKID it would mean 4 stamps each day.

Also visa problems could be an issue. If you are legally working in Shenzhen, you would have a work visa for the PRC and only a visitors visa for HK (thus no HKID). As far as I am aware you would not be entitled to any visa other than a visitors visa in HK unless you are working in HK, are married to a resident of HK and have a dependents visa or have invested 6.5M HKD. You cannot live indefinitely in HK on a visitors visa and would not be entitled to HKID.

Quite a lot of HK locals do work in Shenzhen and live in HK, but do not use a passport, they have HKID and ChinaID and obviously face no visa issues.

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Posted

Why on Earth would you want to live in HK while working in SZ if you don't have to?

The ONLY reason I can see this being better, is if your company in SZ was not willing to help you with getting the proper visa/permit etc.

Please, educate me.

-M

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Posted

There's at least one good reason I've heard of... - no tax.

i.e. China doesn't tax you until you spend a week in the country, which means that you get a lot of Hong Kong residents who live in Hong Kong at the weekend, but have a place in Shenzen where they live near work during the week.

This way, they're not in China long enough in any one visit to be taxed locally, and Hong Kong only taxes based on Hong Kong income.

Admittedly, unless you have an HK resident id card already, I don't see how you could do it as an expat.

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Posted

Well, that makes a lot of sense...especially if your additional living costs don't exceed what you'd expect to be paying out in taxes etc.

Interesting.

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Posted

Huh..., oh wait, you guys have work visa.., so maybe that situation is different?

I have never paid tax to the Chinese government, and I would never want to.

AFAIK, most foreigners weren't taxed even when they are working long term in China, but there were some noise of rule changing. As far as I have heard, it only applies to Beijing or Shanghai though, where there is enough foreigners to make a difference. The other thing is, a lot of people are paid in cash, so I don't see how actually taxing them would work out.

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Posted

Foreigners are taxed in China. My father had to pay in to Chinese taxes. He was in GuangZhou.

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Posted

I always had to pay tax while working in CHina. And it was not a small amount either. That is normal if you are working legally on a work visa there. Unless my employers where just using it as an excuse to shortchange me on my pay. (so they can promise one amount and then when they have me pay me less and say they need to take off 20% for tax). First company always payed me every month in Cash. . 2nd one had me get a bank account and did direct deposit. I was in Beijing.

Huh..., oh wait, you guys have work visa.., so maybe that situation is different?

I have never paid tax to the Chinese government, and I would never want to.

AFAIK, most foreigners weren't taxed even when they are working long term in China, but there were some noise of rule changing. As far as I have heard, it only applies to Beijing or Shanghai though, where there is enough foreigners to make a difference. The other thing is, a lot of people are paid in cash, so I don't see how actually taxing them would work out.

I've never heard of any foreigners living in Hong Kong and working Shenzhen. It's simply too problematic, unless you have both HKID and ChinaID (which foreigners cannot get). It would mean going through immigration twice a day getting 2 stamps China side in your passport each working day and if you don't have HKID it would mean 4 stamps each day.

A

You'd better get a lot of extra pages in your passport if you are going to do this because it will fill up with stamps in a few weeks. Does not seem practical at all.

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Posted

I've heard that many western I.T specialists (I assume other occupations as well, but only know of I.T) will receive 2 salaries. One in CNY recieved in China to live on, and another one in the currency of their home country, paid directly into their account back home.

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Posted

well to be honest guys, I live in Hong Kong and I may take a job in Shenzen.. its just cause they offered a good job and a raise and to get me a china work visa. but I am married to hk woman, so I don't have to worry about any of that :D i can live here and work there, and technically it would be OK for you, because you have to leave hk every 3 months to renew your stay (that is with American passport) and if you were working everyday, that is all good, but I think it would be really hard for you to do this without being married to someone here, best to pay a little more money and get a nice place in shenzen

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Posted

Yeah dude, you don't want to commute everyday. I have some HK friends who do that everyday and like it was mentioned, they don't have to go through passport check yet It's still a 3 hour roundtrip for them daily and it sucks. If you have a job offer in SZ, it sucks but go get an apartment in SZ. Look into the new developing areas near SZ bay.

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Posted

sounds like a case of wanting the best of both worlds - HK security and life style SZ money - sometimes ya can't have both - living in SZ would be fascinating for so many cultural reasons - but you'd have to give up the concept of HK high style living and get down and dirty with the locals - great fun if have the nerve!

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Posted

I'm reading lots of opinions about living in Shenzhen and though I'd love to do this, I would be moving to Hong Kong with my partner who will be working in Hong Kong. Please can someone tell me whether it is possible to live in HK and work in SZ or whether it's not worth even applying for a job in SZ?

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