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Forever Bright Trading Ltd. (Visa Service Agency In Hong Kong)

11 posts in this topic

Posted

I was just informed by Luk Tak over at FBT, that, after October 1st, they will be able to issue me a 6 month and/or 1 year multiple entry visa (for mainland China) -- with no limit on the duration of stay (i.e. the duration of stay lasts until the visa expires; e.g. 6 months or 1 year).

After doing a quick search online, I have found that FBT is a reputable agency that comes highly recommended.

Has anyone had any experience with this agency?

Here is their poorly designed website:

http://www.fbt-chinavisa.com.hk/

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Posted

Oh MAN is that a bad website! :lol: ... That's like using crayons to advertise a bank.

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Posted

It's a barry of a site, that's for sure.

Hopefully they can drum up enough business to pay a proper web designer to do a bang-up job on the V2.0 version.

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Posted

:rolleyes: How retro, it's quaint.

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Posted

All it needs now is an annoying midi sound file to open in the background with every page load :rolleyes:

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Posted

"Easy to get the China Visa at Hong Kong.Our Staff can speak English, Japanese, Cantones, Mandarin. Give the Best Service to you."

"Our Staff can speak English"

"Give the Best Service to you."

I wonder if they are sure about this statement.

I feel like they just put this together in HTML in a few hours. Once in high school I had to make one in HTML.. I waited till the last min, and I feel mine was a little less tacky.

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Posted

I've used them before Methos and they were pretty good and a lot cheaper than CTS.

They are very popular with foreigners here in Shenzhen.

After October 1st.. I've heard a rumour that there are going to be some changes until the 60th anniversary to visa rules again..

Shenzhen had very few foreigners last summer.

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Posted

A post that I made over at ShangHaiExpat (under the topic -- "Beware ALL Visa Agents"):

-I spoke with Luk Tak a few days ago via email, and he made mention of acquiring me a 6 month and/or 1 year (no limit on duration of stay) (F) visa after October 1st (2009); the only documents needed: passport, passport photo and business card.

Now, granted, I own my own company here in the States and could provide a legitimate business card with my name on it (saying something along the lines of 'General Manager', 'Great President and CEO of Awesomness' etc.), but is this really legal? I mean, if it is, great... but I have no idea.

The Chinese Consulate in Chicago:

- http://www.chinacons...rqz/t174774.htm

cheesindave - I heard this rumor too (I think I read about it on some visa site). -I don't know what's going to happen...

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Posted

http://wwww.trax2.com/info/chinanews/china-visa.html

I am used to Profit Reap ( I know, good name, huh? :lac:) by now. I pay HKD 480 for multiple entry F 6 months.

FBT's pricing is very confusing..., so is its requirements...

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Posted

Thanks for the info. How long do you usually have to spend in HK before you can get your visa/passport back?

-And the (F) visa requirements for Reap?

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Posted

How long do you usually have to spend in HK before you can get your visa/passport back?
-I mean, typically, for the (F) visa -- through Reap?

FBT told me that, after the 1st, it was going to be very difficult (but do-able), and quoted me about 2 weeks before it could be obtained.

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