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New Philippine Child Protection Law

2 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

http://www.philstar.com/Article.aspx?artic...ubCategoryId=65

http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/inquirerheadl...ishment-of-kids

The bill provides that any parent, ascendant, teacher, or guardian, who uses corporal punishment, whether verbal, physical, mental or psychological, can be punished under the law.

House Bill 682 also protects students from abusive punishments from teachers and other academic authorities, regardless of when or where corporal punishment was executed.

If approved, the bill can send the guilty to jail.

http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/ceb/2008/...f.children.html

---------------------

In Philippines, such laws are only paper-work, nobody can ever execute them among the ordinary people.

And this is the other side, millions of children without sufficient food.

There are now about 2 million streetchildren in the Philippines.

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http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/ceb/2008/...m.serious..html

Malnutrition problem 'serious'

WHILE many of them have ideal weights, a significant percentage of elementary schoolchildren are still underweight.

Department of Education (DepEd) 7 data collected last year showed that 22.59 percent of Central Visayas’ elementary schoolchildren were malnourished.

.....

Grace Espos, a DepEd 7 nutritionist, attributed the high percentage of underweight schoolchildren mostly to their families economic status.

Edited by yohan

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Posted

http://www.orientexpat.com/forum/index.php?showtopic=18238

This is the other side of the law in UK/EU.

I will visit Philippines/Cebu again this coming week.

As I said in the other thread, I have no problems with my Filipina fostergirl there.

She is always grateful, that she has enough to eat, can go to school, and has medical insurance and can live in a house.

If you have problems with children in UK/EU send them for a few weeks to Philippines - mosquitos and malaria/dengue-fever and street-children and food-shortage - or send them during winter to a village in China.

There will be no UK/EU discipline discussion anymore, as considered to be pointless or baseless.

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