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Cheap Land in Loei, Northern Thailand

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Posted

We were recently told about a piece of land in our friend's area in Loei, Northern Thailand that was being sold. 70000 baht for 1 rai and 70000 baht for a strip 4m x 48m to create an access road.

I was just wondering how often you guys here of land for sale this cheap in any area. Obviously it would normally be through friends of friends or family and possibly if they needed a quick sale to pay for family medical treatment for example. I know it happens but how often. Gotta get me one of them.

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Posted

To be honest, 70000 for 1 rai does not sound cheap to me, although it will largely depend upon where the land is (in/near a reasonably sized town etc), how close to a main road, whether it has services (water, electrics etc) connected or easily connectable.

I had previously been offered 1 rai of build-on-able land which was set back about 30 metres from a main road in a small village about 10 minutes outside Khong (which in turn is approx 90 mins from Korat/Nakhon Ratchasima), so quite a bit further south from Loei. The price I was offered at was 40000 baht - and there were houses adjacent which had services connected already. I didn't take it - partly because I was advised that it had been offered to Thais at 20000 baht, and they thought that was expensive!

A mile or so up the road from there 13 rai of paddyfields (I'm not sure whether they could be built on or not) had recently changed hands for 150000.

There's no set guage for pricing as far as I know - it seems to depend on who is selling and what they want for it, which is largely determined by who they are offering the land to, and how deep that person's pockets are deemed to be....a farang's pockets being nigh-on bottomless of course

That's my experience anyway!

I think you could find a lot of land which would be available to buy especially in NE Thailand once the owner knew there was interest in it.

Bear in mind also that a non-Thai national can't own land outright in his/her name.

Best of luck - do ask around as much as possible before buying if you do decide to buy.

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Posted

Well, Thailand is a big country and outside the main cities, land is indeed pretty cheap, no demand (and no infrastructure).

Pity foreigners can not buy it... B)

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Posted

Yeah no doubt it would go in my wife's name but that is good to know. I thought it may have been rare but it sounds quite promising.

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Posted

I was just wondering how often you guys here of land for sale this cheap

but it sounds quite promising.

'but but but'...

It should always be considered (and always will be anyway, in most cases) money written off... because even if your wife is genuine, you will never see the money again... so, it is always too expensive/never cheap... Put your money in the stock market if you're looking for an investment.

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Posted

It's not about the land, but, as already said, about the right you have as a foreigner.

If you pay baht 150.000,- for such a land, it is (almost) like a gift for a certain Thai person, usually a family member or very good friend.

What you can do, and what you should do is to write a loan contract (Thai have ready forms for that) and to insist that this loan is mention in the land registration form. After that YOU pay, but only if the land-registration form is given to you.

If you keep that chanot (land registration form) with you including the loan contract, in case of quarrels, divorce etc. there is hope to see the money again, as the person using the land cannot sell it without your knowledge and permission despite he/she is the owner.

A lawyer or at least an accounting office should assist you to do the correct legal step.

If you want it even for you to use it for a construction, you might register YOUR building after the construction is finished (but not the land) later on in YOUR name.

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Posted

To be honest, I don't have much anyway but if we were ever to split up, my wife would probably end up looking after our kids. Therefore I would let her have most if not all of it anyway. Despite the possibility of us hating each other, she would still be an amazing mother and I would want them all to be comfortable. I could always get a job and have a fresh start. My god i'm a catch.

Oh and the land would possibly be to build a little house on, grow some fruit and veg, keep a few chickens and have the locals work my little farm in exchange for free English lessons for their kids. All sounds so easy doesn't it. B)

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Posted

Oh and the land would possibly be to build a little house on, grow some fruit and veg, keep a few chickens and have the locals work my little farm in exchange for free English lessons for their kids. All sounds so easy doesn't it.

I noticed, that in another thread you wrote something about YALA and HADYAI, and also PHUKET, now you are mentioning LOEI...

Keep always in mind, that the distances in Thailand for travel are considerable, to manage a little bit here and a little bit there is remarkable time-consuming. YALA to LOEI might be maybe 1800 km or so...

It is good for sure as a foreigner to choose a certain place in Thailand and to stay with it.

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Posted (edited)

Loei is also a totally different ballgame to Phuket.

There are still foreigners living there but in far smaller numbers than the major tourist areas.

Just finding something like some decent bread for a sandwich can be a major operation.

Also the police are much more conscious of expats, I live in a rural area and they used to come and check me out quite regularly.

Now I know them I usually drop by the station once a week when I'm walking the dog and have a bit of a chat.

You won't find many people willing to work for English lessons for their kids up there. The Christian missionaries are well entrenched right across the north and offer free lessons every weekend.

The little house on the land is very possible, just don't expect to make any money out of farming on a small scale.

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Edited by sceadugenga

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Posted

sceadugenga.....Christian missionaries are well entrenched right across the north and offer free lessons every weekend...

Yes, and they have permission to do so.

But a foreigner, who is offering 'free English lessons against farmwork' has no labour permit and could be kicked out of the entire country....also the sale of farming products by foreigners requires a labour permit...

Thailand is quite strict about such regulations regarding 'illegal work'. Always make sure that your passport and visa are valid and not expired, never overstay your visa, never work anything without a labour permission.

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Posted

"Yes, and they have permission to do so".

I don't believe my post indicated in any way that they did not yohan?

Or even any disapproval of their actions.

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Posted

"Yes, and they have permission to do so".

I don't believe my post indicated in any way that they did not yohan?

Or even any disapproval of their actions.

Sorry, but I do not really understand what you want to say, but for sure, all these foreign Christian missionaries in all Thailand have some visa related to their activity.

I do not know, what visa permit they have, but I am sure, they are not offering their prayers on a tourist visa.

If they arrange in their churches meetings and teaching religion and language, there must be some permission that they are allowed to do that in their churches, even if that services are free of charge.

On the other side, if you are a foreigner offering 'English lessons in return of farmwork' I think, this will invite police/immigration and other authorities to investigate if this foreigner is allowed to do that in Thailand, even if this is done on a very small case with a few local Thai people only.

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Posted

They certainly seem to be well established and have several communal farming setups around here.

Their converts seem to be mainly Hillstribes people, the Thais send their chidren to the English lessons but the kids tend to give up fairly quickly.

My wife's six year old nephew told us that five days a week was enough school without going on the weekend as well. B)

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Posted

Would they get upset if I invited a kid or two to join my kids english lessons ? I homeschool and when I get there, I want to get them friends ASAP, and thought this would be a good idea. My kids could then pick up some Thai and have friends, and the kids can pick up some English through play as well.

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Posted

Yohan, I can understand your confusion as I've probably not explained very well. I'm always concious that I ramble on as it is.

Yala - My wife's family are from Yala and we have no intention of living there

Hat Yai - They are temporarily living in Hat Yai to take care of mum coz safer for kids but not too far from a sister in Yala.

Phuket - Because we love it and it may have more opportunities for me to work when I first move over. (may be wrong but will make enquiries when i'm there next month)

And finally Loei - Because that is where our friend found cheapish land for sale and we could never afford land in Phuket. To begin with we would like to have something under our belt and we are told that her area is being developed quite a lot at the moment. Eventually I would be happy to move in to our little house there if I could get work and be a bit self sufficient with fruit/veg/chickens etc. Being a bit of a fat lazy b*****d, I was hoping to get someone to help pick a bit of fruit once a week, or whatever was required, probably for our own consumption in return for educating there kids to some extent.

I'm really hoping that you guys are a small minority and that the rest of the farangs living there have much nicer and positive experiences of the country and for that reason don't need to vent their frustrations on sites like this. Otherwise, i'm buggered.

Oh and Yohan

Before you ask, i'm sure you'll see me talking about various careers in other threads. There just options because they are the things that i know and I believe that if you keep your eggs in one basket you could erm...................well, end up with no eggs. I haven't even started to talk about my real dream job - lighting design but I don't have enough experience or qualifications yet. I won't bore you with that one.

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Posted

Would they get upset if I invited a kid or two to join my kids english lessons ? I homeschool and when I get there, I want to get them friends ASAP, and thought this would be a good idea. My kids could then pick up some Thai and have friends, and the kids can pick up some English through play as well.

Savayla, I would be sure that there would be no problem with this. Once your neighbors come to accept you the problem will be keeping their kids out of your house!

Could I ask you why you home school? Is it a dissatisfaction with the standard of education available? Do you have a problem with some of the things that are taught in public schools, or conversely, some of the things that are not taught?

It's a concept that has always bothered me, I tend to believe that being bullied and learning to swear in the schoolyard is as much a part of growing up as the three Rs.

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Posted

I enjoyed school and did quite well, a prefect etc, good at sports. My husband was the same, deputy head boy, rugby captain, athlete etc. The reason I mention this first is that most people assume that those that homeschool decide to do so because they had a terrible time at school and don't want their kids to go through that . That is not a good reason. The majority of homeschoolers world-wide are Christians who do not want their kids getting influenced. This to me is not a good reason either as their kids will have to face the big bad world some day and all the different religions. One other reason that exists here in SA, is racism. They don't want their kids to go to school with black kids. This never works and the parents soon give up and send their kids back to school as they are not really interested in teaching their kids and did it for the wrong reason.

My husband and I decided to homeschool our kids before they were even born. They learn to swear from us and my youngest has been bullied when she goes to holiday club. Their friends are actually all school going kids, and they attend swimming, gymnastics, etc so they are in contact with other kids.

Placing 35 8 year olds in the same class for 7 hours a day makes no sense to me. The teacher has barely any time for the kids and research has revealed that a child will have 10 minutes a day of one one from a teacher. I give them 1-3 hours of one on one a day. They have a choice of what they want to learn and when. If they are interested in a specific topic then we can tackle it right then. They dont' have to wait for it to appear on the curriculum and they may have lost interest. And we can spend as long as we want on it. Yesterday we took them to see the movie based on Jule Vernes book "Journey to the Centre of the EArth ". We then got all the Earth and Mineral and Rocks books and we will focus on that for a while. My 7 1/2 year just completed her first Enid Blyton book by herself. She has the time to read and enjoys it. My youngest hates colouring in, so she doesnt' have to. We are not even starting maths but do analytical thinking, playing chess, draughts, etc. My eldest loves maths though , especially the bigger sums. She is not scared of it as I was at school. It is fun.

I could go on and on, but basically, we feel that we can give them a better education with far more subjects and world skills. We do think that schools today have gone downhill. This includes the private schools here. The pressure on kids of today is crazy. They have so much to get through that at 8 years old they are doing extra lessons and 2 hours of homework a day. This is because the teachers cannot get through it all. They have not time to be kids. They are getting out of school educated but having no skills to survive in this world.

My girls are well socialised and can have a conversation with a 2 year old or a 67 year old, which they frequently do. They are not stuck in the 8 year old zone. We believe in learning through reading and hands on play, and not in swotting and exams.

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Posted

Yohan's comment on distance is important, I would recommend you settle in an area that has family support. That can be quite a range, in my case I could have picked anywhere from Kanchanaburi to Hat Yai. Having family around is important, particularly if you're away.

Regarding land, apart from the fact you can only 'own' it via the wife, land title comes with several degrees of certitude, you would need to be sure title was assured and you had the right to build. In rural areas title can be far from absolute, and fertile for dispute, especially if there's a 'rich farang' for the fleecing.

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Posted (edited)

I enjoyed school and did quite well, a prefect etc, good at sports. My husband was the same, deputy head boy, rugby captain, athlete etc. The reason I mention this first is that most people assume that those that homeschool decide to do so because they had a terrible time at school and don't want their kids to go through that . That is not a good reason. The majority of homeschoolers world-wide are Christians who do not want their kids getting influenced. This to me is not a good reason either as their kids will have to face the big bad world some day and all the different religions. One other reason that exists here in SA, is racism. They don't want their kids to go to school with black kids. This never works and the parents soon give up and send their kids back to school as they are not really interested in teaching their kids and did it for the wrong reason.

My husband and I decided to homeschool our kids before they were even born. They learn to swear from us and my youngest has been bullied when she goes to holiday club. Their friends are actually all school going kids, and they attend swimming, gymnastics, etc so they are in contact with other kids.

Placing 35 8 year olds in the same class for 7 hours a day makes no sense to me. The teacher has barely any time for the kids and research has revealed that a child will have 10 minutes a day of one one from a teacher. I give them 1-3 hours of one on one a day. They have a choice of what they want to learn and when. If they are interested in a specific topic then we can tackle it right then. They dont' have to wait for it to appear on the curriculum and they may have lost interest. And we can spend as long as we want on it. Yesterday we took them to see the movie based on Jule Vernes book "Journey to the Centre of the EArth ". We then got all the Earth and Mineral and Rocks books and we will focus on that for a while. My 7 1/2 year just completed her first Enid Blyton book by herself. She has the time to read and enjoys it. My youngest hates colouring in, so she doesnt' have to. We are not even starting maths but do analytical thinking, playing chess, draughts, etc. My eldest loves maths though , especially the bigger sums. She is not scared of it as I was at school. It is fun.

I could go on and on, but basically, we feel that we can give them a better education with far more subjects and world skills. We do think that schools today have gone downhill. This includes the private schools here. The pressure on kids of today is crazy. They have so much to get through that at 8 years old they are doing extra lessons and 2 hours of homework a day. This is because the teachers cannot get through it all. They have not time to be kids. They are getting out of school educated but having no skills to survive in this world.

My girls are well socialised and can have a conversation with a 2 year old or a 67 year old, which they frequently do. They are not stuck in the 8 year old zone. We believe in learning through reading and hands on play, and not in swotting and exams.

OK, I suppose it's what you think is best.

From personal experience I'd hate to have missed my Primary School years, there was something magical about them.

I hated High School though for all the reasons you mention... to good at some things and not good enough at others.

And I won't even start to talk about the bloody hormones. B)

Edited by sceadugenga

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Posted

Regarding land, apart from the fact you can only 'own' it via the wife, land title comes with several degrees of certitude, you would need to be sure title was assured and you had the right to build. In rural areas title can be far from absolute, and fertile for dispute, especially if there's a 'rich farang' for the fleecing.

Yeah, my wife is very paranoid about these issues and would be very thorough. Would you say that it may be a good idea to hire a decent to investigate?

Savayla,

It sounds to me like you have quite a nice balance with your children's education and I often think how good it would be (if I was rich enough) to travel with our kids and teach them how to be worldly and compassionate towards the people who need it most. I know it'll never happen but hey? I'll have to try my best on a smaller scale.

In the short term, i'm sure your girls will pick up lots of valuble skills that others won't but i was wondering how you see their future in the long term. Wouldn't they struggle to find work without acredited qualifications and what would happen if at a later date, they resented you for not providing them with a recognised education. I for one wish i'd worked harder at school.

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Posted

Indeed, having a good lawyer give it the once over would be a sensible move.

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[savayla,

It sounds to me like you have quite a nice balance with your children's education and I often think how good it would be (if I was rich enough) to travel with our kids and teach them how to be worldly and compassionate towards the people who need it most. I know it'll never happen but hey? I'll have to try my best on a smaller scale.

In the short term, i'm sure your girls will pick up lots of valuble skills that others won't but i was wondering how you see their future in the long term. Wouldn't they struggle to find work without acredited qualifications and what would happen if at a later date, they resented you for not providing them with a recognised education. I for one wish i'd worked harder at school.

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Posted

What are the lowest prices currently, for 1 rai of land in the Isan remotest areas?

Thanks ;-)

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